Federalism

Published: 3/21/2014 10:53 AM

The Federalism unit consists of 5 lessons organized around the question, “How does federalism support a democracy”?

 

​Prior to the implementation of this unit, students will complete an entry level assessment aligned to the end of unit assessment to gauge their prior knowledge of federalism.

Students will also complete a civic disposition pre-assessment measuring their understanding, demonstration and/or advocacy of civic dispositions targeted in the unit.

Throughout this unit, students will self-assess their performance of the civic dispositions targeted in each lesson. Students explore how federalism, under the U.S.

Constitution and Kentucky Constitution, reflects purposes, values and principles of American Representative Democracy, how powers are distributed and shared between the national government and Kentucky’s government and how conflicts and compromises (e.g., issues, court cases, policies, legislation and funding) can arise between local, state and federal governments in order to meet the needs of citizens and protect the “common good”.

Through the end of unit assessment, students will gain a greater understanding of federalism in the United States by researching and analyzing important issues within the local community.

Students will then create a citizen’s guide to help inform the community about who is responsible within the government and what level of government is responsible for addressing identified issues of the community.

Federalism Unit Overview
Federalism End of Unit Assessment
FED End of Unit Assessment Implementation
FED End of Unit Assessment: Strategies for Implementation
Lesson 1
FED unit - Lesson 1 - "Federalism: Systems of Government" Length - 3 Days (60 mins)
Lesson Essential Question(s):
1.    How does federalism in the United States promote representative democracy?
This is the first lesson of a 5 lesson unit on federalism.
In this lesson, students will be introduced to the 3 basic systems of government to gain a deeper understanding of why the United States operates under a federal system of government.
Prior to the implementation of this lesson, students will complete a base line open-ended question assessment to gauge student prior knowledge of federalism.
This will be aligned to the end of unit assessment for the unit.
In this lesson, students will apply their new knowledge of federalism in a simulation in which they are given a role governments perform (i.e., coin money, public education, levy taxes) and they must decide to which level(s) of government their role belongs.
Finally, students will analyze how federalism continues to help the U.S. government sustain its purposes, values and the principles of promoting democracy by completing a task of students’ choice from a RAFT.
Civic dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
Student Friendly Learning Target(s):
1.    I can demonstrate persistence as I define, classify, and provide examples of current and past governments as unitary, federal, or confederacy.
2.    I can demonstrate critical mindedness and persistence as I work with my group to identify responsibilities for each level of government.
3.    I can demonstrate persistence as I explain how federalism promotes the purposes, values, and principles of American representative democracy.
Lesson 1 Resources
   FED Resource 1A         Systems of Government Chart
FED Resource 1B        
Systems of Government Documents
FED Resource 1C        
Power Cards
FED Resource 1D        
Venn Diagram and Answer Key
FED Resource 1E        
The Federalist No. 16 and Antifederalist VI - primary source documents
FED Resource 1F         
Federalist No. 16 and Antifederalist VI - summaries (differentiated option)
FED Resource 1G        
Federalist and Antifederalist Papers - BKWLQ Chart
FED Resource 1H        
Federalist and Antifederalist Papers Suggested Responses
FED Resource 1I         
Federalism RAFT and Scoring Guide
FED Resource 1J         
Pre-Assessment Scoring Guide
FED Resource 1K        
Community Poll: My Needs and Who is Responsible for Addressing?
 
Lesson 2
FED unit - Lesson 2 - "Federalism: Constitutional Powers" Length - 2 Days (60 mins)
Lesson Essential Question(s):
1.    How does the U.S. Constitution ensure that the powers of government are separate and shared to protect the common good?
2.    How did the framers delegate powers to the federal government in the Constitution to promote the common good?
In this lesson students will consider how the common good is promoted by:
1)   comparing different types of powers in the Constitution (implied, expressed, reserved, concurrent and denied).
2)   analyzing supporting materials dealing with Article I, Article IV, Article VI and Amendment 10 and explain how each established the powers of the federal government and promotes the common good, and
3)   determining what level of government has jurisdiction over an issue, based on the Constitution.
This is the second lesson in a 5 lesson unit on Federalism. In this lesson, students will learn about the types of powers given to various levels of our government in the Constitution (expressed, implied, reserved, concurrent, and denied), and they will consider how the common good is promoted by these various types of power.
They will also complete a jigsaw activity, reading and sharing information on court decisions that applied Article I, Article IV, Article VI, and Amendment 10 of the Constitution.
This lesson will conclude with a brief learning check.
Civic dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
Student Friendly Learning Target(s):
1.    I can demonstrate critical mindedness while I compare types of powers related to the Constitution (expressed, implied, reserved, concurrent and denied) and explain how the types of powers promote the common good.
2.    I can demonstrate critical mindedness and negotiation and compromise while I work with a group to analyze Article I, Article IV, Article VI, and the 10th Amendment and explain how each established the powers of the federal government and promote the common good.
3.    I can demonstrate critical mindedness and negotiation and compromise while I work with a group to determine what level of government has jurisdiction over an issue based on the Constitution and explain how the separation of powers promotes the common good.
Lesson 2 Resources
   FED Resource 2A      Dividing the Powers of Government
FED Resource 2B     
Powers of Government Chart
FED Resource 2C     
Constitutional Excerpts
FED Resource 2D      The Powers of Government Power Point
FED Resource 2E       Constitutional Topics & Case Studies Graphic Organizer
FED Resource 2F       Supreme Court Case Summaries
FED Resource 2G      Learning Check and Key
 
Lesson 3
FED unit - Lesson 3 - "Federalism: Changes Over Time" Length - 2 Days
Lesson Essential Question:
1.    How have the distribution and/or division of power at the local, state, and federal levels changed over time to protect individual rights and promote the common good?
In this lesson students study historical debates about federal powers.
Students will learn about different historical eras and how key events during those eras reflected conflicts related to federalism (i.e. the National Bank controversy, Civil War, Great Depression, and Civil Rights Movement).
Student will evaluate (using primary source documents) the degree to which the U.S. government has used its powers to protect individual rights and promote the common good in relation to federalism.
Student Friendly Learning Target(s):
1.    I can demonstrate persistence while I interpret primary source materials (documents, letters, political cartoons, et al.) to identify and explain historical events (National Bank Controversy, Civil War, Great Depression, Civil Rights Movement, et al.) and how they reflected conflict related to federalism.
2.    I can demonstrate persistence and critical mindedness while I work with a partner to analyze court cases (McCulloch v. Maryland, Gibbons v. Ogden, et al.), amendments (14th Amendment, et al.), and legislation (New Deal, Brady bill et al.) to determine how each attempted to settle these conflicts over federalism.
3.    I can demonstrate persistence and critical mindedness while I evaluate the degree to which the U.S. government has used its powers to protect individual rights and promote the common good in relation to federalism over time through an examination of current events, court cases, amendments, and legislation.
In this lesson students study historical debates about federal powers.
Students will learn about different historical eras and how key events during those eras reflected conflicts related to federalism (i.e. the National Bank controversy, Civil War, Great Depression, and Civil Rights Movement).
Student will evaluate (using primary source documents) the degree to which the U.S. government has used its powers to protect individual rights and promote the common good in relation to federalism.
Civic dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
Lesson 3 Resources
   FED Resource 3A      Anticipation Guide
FED Resource 3B      Federalism Eras Matrix
FED Resource 3C      Federalism Eras Documents
FED Resource 3D      ThinkDot
FED Resource 3E      Federalism ThinkDot Rubric
Fed Resource 3F       The Document Based Question (DBQ) APPARTS Strategy
FED Resource 3G      “Common Good” Defense Scoring Guide
FED Resource 3H      Federalism – Short Version - Optional Resource
FED Resource 3I       Federalism PowerPoint - Optional Resource
FED Resource 3J       Federalism - Document Study - Optional Resource
 
Lesson 4
Lesson Essential Question:
1.    How has federalism changed over time and how do these changes embody democracy, protect individual rights, and promote the common good?
Day 1 - Students will explore federalism historically by comparing dual, cooperative and new federalism.
Students will be asked to define each type of federalism and identify and provide explanations of historical examples.
Students will also be asked to explain how each form of federalism embodies democracy, protects individual rights, and promotes the common good.
Day 2-3 (optional) – Students will compare how categorical grants and block grants reflect federalism fiscally through a bellringer and class activity.
Students will then explain how mandates and conditions of aid that accompany federal money give power(s) to the federal, state, and/or local governments by participating in a Socratic seminar.
Civic dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
Student Friendly Learning Target(s):
1.    I can demonstrate critical mindedness and persistence as I work with a small group to compare dual, cooperative and new federalism by identifying and providing explanations of historical examples over time.
2.    I can demonstrate critical mindedness as I explain how each type of federalism embodies democracy, protects individual rights, and promotes the common good.
3.    I can demonstrate and advocate civility and open mindedness as I work with a group to compare how categorical grants and block grants reflect federalism fiscally. (optional)
4.    I can demonstrate and advocate open mindedness and courage as I participate in a Socratic seminar to explain how mandates and conditions of aid that accompany federal money give power(s) to the federal, state, special districts, and/or local governments. (optional)
Lesson 4 Resources
   FED Lesson 4A        Types of Federalism Anticipation Guide
FED Resource 4B     Types of Federalism - Reading
FED Resource 4C     Types of Federalism - Worksheet
FED Resource 4D     Types of Federalism: Exit Slip
FED Resource 4E      Defining Federalism Grants – Chart
FED Resource 4F      Grant Packet
FED Resource 4G     Critical Information Sheet
FED Resource 4H      Grant Scenarios
FED Resource 4I       Government Analysis Form
FED Resource 4J       Justification/Action Plan
FED Resource 4K      Socratic Seminar Observation Form
FED Resource 4L      Socratic Seminar Rubric
 
Lesson 5
Lesson Essential Question:
1.    How is federalism reflected in KY and our local community to protect the common good?
Day 1 – Students will examine the differences between state constitutions and the US Constitution. They will then examine the differences between the Kentucky Constitution and US Constitution and interpret how the differences promote the common good in Kentucky.
Day 2-3 - Students will justify which level(s) of government should be responsible for identified current debates related to federalism in small groups over a two day period in order to understand how modern conceptions of Federalism embody democracy, protect individual rights, and promote the common good.
Day 4—6 - Students will complete culminating assessment.
Civic dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets. Student Friendly Learning Target(s):
1.    I can practice critical mindedness as I work with a partner to identify the difference between the Kentucky Constitution and the US Constitution and interpret how the differences promote the common good.
2.    I can demonstrate civility, negotiation and compromise and open mindedness as I participate in a group to prepare for a debate to justify which level(s) of government should be responsible for identified current debates related to federalism.
Jennifer Fraker
Office of Next-Generation Learners
Division of Program Standards
500 Mero Street, 18th Floor CPT
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 564-2106
Fax (502) 564-9848