International Relations

Published: 3/21/2014 11:02 AM

The International Relations unit consists of 4 lessons organized around the question, “How can I contribute to living in a just world”?

 

​Prior to the implementation of this unit, students will complete an entry level assessment aligned to the end of unit assessment to gauge their prior knowledge of international relations.

Students will also complete a civic disposition pre-assessment measuring their understanding, demonstration and/or advocacy of civic dispositions targeted in the unit.

Throughout this unit, students will self-assess their performance of the civic dispositions targeted in each lesson.

The leading theories of international relations are introduced to students to gain a deeper understanding of how the international system functions and how the various actors in the system interact using four sources of power (social, political, economic, military) to contribute/not contribute to a just world.

Students are introduced to steps involved in writing a case study through an examination of the Holocaust, using a case study template similar to the one they will use later for their own case study in the edn of unit assessment.

Students bring exposure to an international issue related to the environment, health, economics, human rights, or other topics developed by the class/teacher through the end of unit assessment.
Students research the issue in question, complete a case study template, and design a strategy of influence that will draw attention to the issue through a chosen mean.

IR Unit Overview
IR Unit Template
Lesson Essential Questions:
    1. What are political international relations?
    2. How do I identify with the international community?
In this lesson, students will be introduced to the leading theories of international relations to gain a deeper understanding of how the international system functions and how the various actors in the system interact. Prior to the implementation of this lesson, students will complete an entry level assessment aligned to the end of unit assessment, to gauge their prior knowledge of international relations. Students will also complete a civic disposition pre-assessment. In this lesson, students will define and identify international relation theories. The teacher will also introduce and explain the end of unit assessment to students. Students will generate a list of possible topics related to an international issue in the areas of environment, health, economics, human rights, or other topics developed by the class/teacher. Note: Many resources have been developed for this lesson because several options are presented for activities. Teachers will only use the resources that align to the option they have chosen to implement.
Civic Dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
    1. I can demonstrate honesty as I explain who I am and how I address conflict.
    2. I can demonstrate persistence as I work to describe liberal, realist, and radical theories of international relations.
    3. I can demonstrate critical mindedness and courage when discussing current events/issues to analyze how they align to the international relations theories.
    4. I can demonstrate civility, open mindedness and critical mindedness when working with others to respond to statements about international relations.
Lesson 1 Resources
   Resource 1B    Identity Chart
   Resource 1C    Modified Frayer Models
   Resource 1E    Think, Pair, Share
   Resource 1F     International Theory Assessment
   Resource 1G    The Melian Dialogue
   Resource 1H    The Melian Dialogue-Modified
   Resource 1I     The Invasion
   Resource 1Ja    Cuban Missile Crisis
   Resource 1Jb    Cuban Missile Crisis - modified
   Resource 1Jc    Cuban Missile Crisis - modified
   Resource 1K     Human Barometer
   Resource 1L     Quotes Threaded Discussion
 
Lesson Essential Question:
    1. How do various actors in the international system use various sources of power to contribute/not contribute to a just world?
In this lesson, students will be introduced to four sources of power to gain a deeper understanding of how various actors in the international system use different sources of power to contribute/not contribute to a just world.
Students will complete a RAFT activity to assess their knowledge of sources of power in the international system.
Civic Dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
    1. I can demonstrate persistence as I define international system.
    2. I can demonstrate civility and open mindedness as I work with a partner to create and present a product that defines power as it relates to the international system.
    3. I can demonstrate open mindedness as I formulate (develop) a standard for establishing justice.
    4. I can demonstrate persistence when identifying actors in the international system.
    5. I can recognize when the rights and liberties of individuals are being abused and demonstrate civic mindedness and courage to take a position on the issue and advocate a position.
    6. I can demonstrate critical mindedness, civic mindedness and courage when explaining and evaluating how various actors in the international system contribute/ do not contribute to a just world.
IR Lesson 2   Resources
   IR Resource 2A      Think-Pair-Share
   IR Resource 2B      Modified Verbal and Visual Word Association
   IR Resource 2D      Websites for Sources of Power PowerPoint
   IR Resource 2E      Sources of Power Sample Powerpoint
   IR Resource 2F      PowerPoint Storyboard
   IR Resource 2G      PLAN OF ACTION: Exit Slip
   IR Resource 2H      Exit Slip
   IR Resource 2I       Justice Rubric/Checklist
   IR Resource 2J       International Relations Web Quest
   IR Resource 2K      International System Stations Chart
   IR Resource 2L      WLK Chart
   IR Resource 2M      Actors in the International System RAFT
   IR Resource 2N      Brainstorming International Issues
 
Lesson Essential Question:
    1. How did the international response to the Holocaust promote/not promote a just world?
In this lesson students will be introduced to steps involved in writing a case study through an examination of the Holocaust.
Students will be developing a case study/strategy of influence for the end of unit assessment.
In this lesson, students will use prior knowledge and primary source material to develop a case study on the Holocaust.
Students will start by completing a timeline activity to assess prior knowledge of the Holocaust.
Next, students will read accounts of various groups involved in the Holocaust and analyze sources of power used to preserve/not preserve the rights and liberties of individuals during the Holocaust.
Students will then complete a jigsaw activity and examine how international relation theories apply to the response of international actors to the Holocaust.
Finally, students will brainstorm ways in which an individual can develop a strategy of influence on Holocaust education.
Civic Dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
    1. I can demonstrate persistence and civility when working individually and in groups to organize events chronologically.
    2. I can demonstrate persistence in the pursuit of truth to analyze and discuss with civility, and critical mindedness rights and liberties of individuals during the Holocaust.
    3. I can demonstrate honesty, civility and critical mindedness to discuss and describe various sources of powers of groups who lost their liberties during the Holocaust.
    4. I can demonstrate persistence to analyze various purposes and sources of power of actors in the international system in addressing the Holocaust.
    5. I can demonstrate persistence in the pursuit of truth, honesty, and critical mindedness to write a case study and develop a strategy of influence related to Holocaust education.
Lesson 3 Resources
   IR Resource 3A      Holocaust Timeline
   IR Resource 3B      Events Title and Images
   IR Resource 3C      The Holocaust Case Study
   IR Resource 3D      The Holocaust Jigsaw Document Study
   IR Resource 3E      Think-Pair-Share
   IR Resource 3F       International Actors Readings
 
Lesson Essential Question:
    1. How is the world responding/not responding to my issue?
    2. Why is the international response to my issue a just/unjust response?
To be most effective, this lesson requires several days in which students have access to technology (Internet, digital cameras, etc.).
In this lesson, students research and write a case study on an international issue that concerns them.
They will then complete the end of unit assessment by planning a strategy of influence and creating a product that could be presented to a local audience to try to increase awareness of their issue.
Civic Dispositions targeted in this lesson are reflected in the student friendly learning targets.
    1. I can demonstrate civility and honesty when working with other people to develop my case study and strategy of influence.
    2. I can demonstrate persistence, critical mindedness and civic mindedness to research and develop a case study on my identified issue describing and analyzing • my perspective • how the rights and liberties of individuals are or are not preserved • various purposes and sources of power of actors in the international system in responding to the issue • how international relation theories (liberal, realist, radical) apply to the issue • my strategy of influence
    3. I can demonstrate persistence, open mindedness, critical mindedness, compassion and civic mindedness to analyze how addressing an international issue contributes to having a just world.
    4. I can advocate civic mindedness through the development of a strategy of influence.
Lesson 4 Resources
   IR Resource 4A      Placards: Possible Topics/Issues
   IR Resource 4B      My International Issue Case Study Template
   IR Resource 4C      My International Issue Research Notes
   IR Resource 4D      Suggested Websites
   IR Resource 4E      IR Choice Board Template
Jennifer Fraker
Office of Next-Generation Learners
Division of Program Standards
500 Mero Street, 18th Floor CPT
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 564-2106
Fax (502) 564-9848