Middle School Practical Living-Vocational Studies Curriculum Maps

Published: 10/3/2012 1:55 PM

​Middle School Practical Living-Vocational Studies Curriculum Maps

 

Jessamine County 8th Grade Physical Education Curriculum Map
Jessamine County Schools shared their 8th grade physical education curriculum map and the description below.

Jessamine County Schools
8th Grade PE

Why did your school/district decide to develop curriculum maps?
We needed to vertically and horizontally align the curriculum and to define student outcomes for each grade level and course. There were gaps in essential content and skills. Upon analysis of our assessments we also found that there was a need for depth, rigor and challenge within our courses. We had also made assumptions about what was supposed to be mastered at each grade level. We needed curriculum maps to help us define at each grade level the student expectations for mastery.

Additionally, we needed a document that we could use for new teachers to define learning expectations for their new assignment. Curriculum maps could serve that purpose. Curriculum maps are being used to aide us in our discussions at critical transition points (Kindergarten to elementary, elementary to middle, and middle to high). We could have much more productive conversations about expectations using the maps as points of discussion. Rather than saying, "They are coming to us unprepared," we could use the maps to discuss student outcomes for content and processes from level to level.
 
How did your school/district begin and what were the stages in the process?
We first began the maps for the purpose of vertical articulation and gap analysis. We defined the standards of the Academic Expectations, Program of Studies and Core Content for each grade level and course. At the district level we began to define the critical elements the maps would contain. When that was completed we began work to identify what students should know and be able to do at each grade level and in each course. Our elementary schools worked together to agree upon common expectations for students in the core classes. They then expanded the work to include arts and humanities and practical. In our middle and high schools, each school met twice per month in content areas and by grade levels to work on the maps and discuss vertical and horizontal articulation. By the end of the year we had our first draft. Each of the secondary schools had used a slightly different form but each map contained the critical elements. Arts and humanities teachers and practical living and vocational teachers found it preferable to work as district groups because so many of them had singleton courses. We arranged for them to work together using district funds.
 
Where is your school/district in the development of curriculum maps?
We are in need at this time to refine our curriculum maps. Upon first draft review we observed a need for discussion on rigor and challenge. We have decided to use our maps to begin work on common performance tasks and KCCT-like summative questions for each course. As we work on challenging performance tasks and summative assessments we will need to make revision to the curriculum maps and should see evidence of increased rigor and challenge reflected on our maps. We understand that the work on curriculum maps will be a continuous process. We are going to continue to develop common assessments and as we do we will continue to wrestle with issues such as time to teach, depth of content, rigor, challenge, motivation, differentiation. It will take time to build all of this into our courses and as we do we will see an evolution in our curriculum maps. Analysis of student work on the common assessments will drive the revisions we need to make in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Our maps will be used by teacher to develop or refine Standards based units of study. We see this as a continuous process of refinement and adjustment based on the needs of our students.
 
What are your next steps in the development of curriculum maps or after completion of maps?
Our next steps include the use of maps to develop common performance assessments and summative assessments. They will also be used by teachers to develop or refine standards based units of study. This cyclic process means that our curriculum maps will be revised often. The work that we are providing at this time represents our first efforts to truly define what students should know and be able to do in each grade level or course. It becomes a map to guide us but also to show progress through revision. It provides points of discussion throughout the district for improvement. It will also be use by principals for classroom observations and discussions for individual teacher growth.

EJMS Curriculum Map/ Horizontal Alignment
Content Area: PE Grade Level: 8th
Note: If you'd like to use this map or amend it to suit your needs, please check below for a handy Microsoft Word version. Just click on the Word icon to open it on your computer, and then choose Word's Save As command to save it locally.

EJMS Map PE 8th.docEJMS Map PE 8th.doc


Jessamine County Middle Schools PLVS Curriculum Maps
West Jessamine Middle School and East Jessamine Middle School shared these exemplary PLVS middle school curriculum maps.

Jessamine County Middle Schools
PLVS Curriculum Maps
Why did your school/district decide to develop curriculum maps?
We needed to vertically and horizontally align the curriculum and to define student outcomes for each grade level and course. There were gaps in essential content and skills. Upon analysis of our assessments we also found that there was a need for depth, rigor and challenge within our courses. We had also made assumptions about what was supposed to be mastered at each grade level. We needed curriculum maps to help us define at each grade level the student expectations for mastery.

Additionally, we needed a document that we could use for new teachers to define learning expectations for their new assignment. Curriculum maps could serve that purpose. Curriculum maps are being used to aide us in our discussions at critical transition points (Kindergarten to elementary, elementary to middle, and middle to high). We could have much more productive conversations about expectations using the maps as points of discussion. Rather than saying, "They are coming to us unprepared," we could use the maps to discuss student outcomes for content and processes from level to level.

How did your school/district begin and what were the stages in the process?
We first began the maps for the purpose of vertical articulation and gap analysis. We defined the standards of the Academic Expectations, Program of Studies and Core Content for each grade level and course. At the district level we began to define the critical elements the maps would contain. When that was completed we began work to identify what students should know and be able to do at each grade level and in each course. Our elementary schools worked together to agree upon common expectations for students in the core classes. They then expanded the work to include arts and humanities and practical. In our middle and high schools, each school met twice per month in content areas and by grade levels to work on the maps and discuss vertical and horizontal articulation. By the end of the year we had our first draft. Each of the secondary schools had used a slightly different form but each map contained the critical elements. Arts and humanities teachers and practical living and vocational teachers found it preferable to work as district groups because so many of them had singleton courses. We arranged for them to work together using district funds.

Where is your school/district in the development of curriculum maps?
We are in need at this time to refine our curriculum maps. Upon first draft review we observed a need for discussion on rigor and challenge. We have decided to use our maps to begin work on common performance tasks and KCCT-like summative questions for each course. As we work on challenging performance tasks and summative assessments we will need to make revision to the curriculum maps and should see evidence of increased rigor and challenge reflected on our maps. We understand that the work on curriculum maps will be a continuous process. We are going to continue to develop common assessments and as we do we will continue to wrestle with issues such as time to teach, depth of content, rigor, challenge, motivation, differentiation. It will take time to build all of this into our courses and as we do we will see an evolution in our curriculum maps. Analysis of student work on the common assessments will drive the revisions we need to make in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Our maps will be used by teacher to develop or refine Standards based units of study. We see this as a continuous process of refinement and adjustment based on the needs of our students.
What are your next steps in the development of curriculum maps or after completion of maps?
Our next steps include the use of maps to develop common performance assessments and summative assessments. They will also be used by teachers to develop or refine standards based units of study. This cyclic process means that our curriculum maps will be revised often. The work that we are providing at this time represents our first efforts to truly define what students should know and be able to do in each grade level or course. It becomes a map to guide us but also to show progress through revision. It provides points of discussion throughout the district for improvement. It will also be used by principals for classroom observations and discussions for individual teacher growth.
For more information about this map, please contact Felicia Roher, Professional Development, at Jessamine County Schools.
Note: If you'd like to use this map or amend it to suit your needs, please check below for a handy Microsoft Word version. Just click on the Word icon to open it on your computer, then choose Word's Save As command to save it locally.
Fayette County Schools Middle School Health and Physical Education Curriculum Maps
Fayette County Schools shared their middle school Health and PE curriculum maps and the description below.

Fayette County Schools
Health and PE

FCPS began a curriculum mapping project after conducting a needs assessment with school-level leadership teams across the district. In addition to assistance with curriculum development, school leaders identified a need for additional assistance in development of assessment items, instructional strategies, resources, etc. Thus the two-part format for the FCPS Recommended Curriculum Map and Framework was developed.
 
Building on existing curriculum development documents, district curriculum content specialists began "layering" content areas beginning with assessment years. For example, Math curriculum was mapped at the 8th grade level first, then backed down through 7th, 6th, eventually to Kindergarten. To work "horizontally," content-area specialists used the identical process, but within grade levels adjusted the "maps" to include adequate opportunities for interdisciplinary teams to develop Standards-Based Units of Study.
 
Most schools in Fayette County have adopted the recommended product as a beginning point, and have begun adjusting timelines and content "selections" to meet the needs of individual school and/or classroom populations. While the original product was completed for K-8th grades, beginning in 2004-2005 staff will collaborate with high schools to develop 9th-12th grade products as well.
 
In addition, FCPS is putting emphasis on development of assessment items (in collaboration with the helpful staff of the Jefferson County Public Schools) to be matched to the "map" to better allow teachers to use strong assessment items within the flow of their teaching. A more distant part of that work will be to develop benchmark student work samples, tied again to the curriculum map product. Finally, FCPS will begin assisting schools in the development of sample, high-quality standards-based units of study.
 
In the end FCPS hopes to have a product that fully puts in place content and performance standards that established a rigorous, interesting curriculum with which our students may work.

For more information about these maps, please contact Jack Hayes at Fayette County Schools.
 
Note: If you'd like to use these maps or amend them to suit your needs, please click on the Word icons to open them on your computer, then choose Word's Save As command to save them locally.
6th Grade Health
CM FCPS 6 Health.docCM FCPS 6 Health.doc

6th Grade PE
CM FCPS 6 PE.docCM FCPS 6 PE.doc

7th Grade Health
CM FCPS 7 Health.docCM FCPS 7 Health.doc

7th Grade PE
CM FCPS 7 PE.docCM FCPS 7 PE.doc

8th Grade Health
CM FCPS 8 Health.docCM FCPS 8 Health.doc

8th Grade PE
CM FCPS 8 PE.docCM FCPS 8 PE.doc
Karen Kidwell
Office of Next-Generation Learners
Division of Program Standards
500 Mero Street, 18th Floor CPT

Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 564-2106
Fax (502) 564-9848