Summer Reading

Published: 1/8/2014 9:11 AM

The Kentucky Department of Education encourages all students to read during the summer by participating in Kentucky’s Summer Reading Programs at local Kentucky public libraries. Click here to find out more about programs sponsored by a library in your area.
 

Visit “Find a Book, Kentucky” to build custom reading lists of books before you visit the library or bookstore. “Find a Book, Kentucky” is an easy-to-use tool to help students find books to match their reading ability (Lexile® measure) and interests. Click the “Find a Book, Kentucky” icon, or go to www.lexile.com/fab/ky to get started, and follow these simple steps:

1. Enter a Lexile measure (available from many schools) or choose an option under “I don’t know my Lexile measure”
2. Choose interest categories
3. Refine search results using the sidebar tools 
4. Print a personalized summer reading list

 

 

The Kentucky Virtual Library (KYVL) provides access to two of the largest periodical database providers, EBSCO and ProQuest, both of which have Lexile® measures for articles. EBSCO’s NoveList (accessed through KYVL) assists fiction readers in finding new authors and titles and provides Lexile measures as a guide. Contact your child’s school library media specialist for login and password information to KYVL.

Helpful links:

 

Additional Resources


ReadWriteThink.org's Parent & Afterschool Resources and NCTE provide many resources, activities, and tools.

For suggestions for books for summer reading, see the Voices from the Middle article "Student to Student: Roadmaps for the Treacherous Journey" (M). The books reviewed here offer "roadmaps" as their protagonists face tough situations with courage and perseverance.

Classroom Notes Plus author Gloria Pipkin asks, "Why don't we devote some time during the last couple of weeks of school to promoting real summer reading? Not mandating or requiring or assigning but encouraging it." The article "Promoting Real Summer Reading" (M-S) lists a few ways Pipkin has tried and some she'd like to try.

Interested in starting a book club with children and teens this summer? Read English Journal article "Facilitating a Summer Reading Book Group Program".

Looking for additional summer-themed activities? Check out the Bright Ideas section of ReadWriteThink.org. The Support Literacy Learning All Year Long handout can also be shared with parents, families, and others interested in learning outside of the classroom.

In “How Can Schools and Teachers Target the Prevention of the ‘Summer Slide’?” ELA specialist Anita Gonzalez stresses the importance of knowing the stats, knowing the policies, knowing your community, and knowing your students and their families.

Finding a Great Summer Program: A Checklist for Parents
Early and sustained summer learning opportunities lead to higher graduation rates, better preparation for college, and positive effects on children's self-esteem, confidence, and motivation. High-quality summer programs keep students engaged in learning, teach them new skills, allow them to develop previously unseen talents, and foster creativity and innovation. Use this checklist to find the perfect summer program for your child.

Unpack This Beach Bag of Ideas for Summer Learning
Heading off to camp, writing pen pals, and listening to a few good books are all great summer activities. Browse adlit.org’s virtual beach bag of ideas just for tweens and teens. You'll find materials to download and print, expert advice on how to communicate your child's needs to summer camp staff, book suggestions, and much more.

 

Kathy Mansfield
Office of Next-Generation Learners
Division of Program Standards
500 Mero Street, 19th Floor CPT
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 564-9850
Fax (502) 564-9848