Surveys and Results

Published: 6/16/2013 4:28 PM

 

Technology Readiness Survey - Conducted annually by KDE, this survey provides a snapshot of the technology environment throughout Kentucky’s schools and districts. This is a key component of monitoring trends and activities for the use of technology in education, as reflected within the 2011 summary. More students have computers (79 percent) and Internet access (73 percent) at home. These percentages are up 1 percent from 2010. Of those students who have Internet access at home, approximately 79 percent have broadband (high-speed) access such as cable modem or DSL (usually provided by the local telephone company). Refer to Section 1 of the Survey, Home Access for Students for data.​





Approximately 58 percent of districts allow students to bring personally owned instructional devices --laptops, tablets, mobile devices -- to school. Almost 82 percent of districts allow teachers and 83.5 percent allow administrators to bring personally owned instructional devices to school. These percentages have continued to increase over past years as more districts are moving toward a "bring your own device" policy and plan. Refer to Section 4 of the Survey, Personally Owned Computing Devices for data.





Almost one-third of district-owned instructional devices are mobile, which is defined as laptops, tablets and next-generation instructional devices. This tends to reflect the growing recognition of ease of access as a key component of always on, anywhere and anytime learning. Refer to Section 2 of the Survey, Total Number of Instructional Devices that are Laptops/Tablets for data.









The infusion of $50 million in funding from the Kentucky General Assembly for the Instructional Device Upgrade Project during FY06 and FY07 resulted in an ongoing increase to the number of devices that meet or exceed minimum standards to the point that 83 percent of student devices currently qualify. However, without continued funding methods being available for refreshing student instructional devices, districts will begin to see this number decrease, slowly in calendar year 2012 and then rapidly decreasing through 2014. Refer to Section 2 of the Survey, Total Number of Instructional Devices for data.


Kentucky schools report a total of 261,398 student instructional devices that meet or exceed minimum technical standards -- desktops, laptops and tablets. This is almost 12,000 more devices that meet and/or exceed the minimum standards than districts owned in 2010. Refer to Section 2 of the Survey, Total Number of Instructional Devices for data.

Multiple factors are leading districts to move to the latest versions of the Windows OS and/or the latest Microsoft productivity suite. This is due in part to more districts participating in the Microsoft licensing agreements as well as the retirement of older machines. Twenty-nine percent of all instructional devices running Microsoft Office utilize the latest version (Office 2010). 30 percent of all instructional devices using a Windows operating system run Windows 7. Refer to Section 3 of the Survey, Instructional Device Software for data.

 





Districts are now taking advantage of video-based communications to improve both communications and remote learning opportunities. Almost 67 percent of all districts use desktop-based communications like WebEx, Elluminate and others, while nearly 86 percent of districts use Web-based options such as iChat and Skype. Refer to Section 9 of the Survey, Video Conferencing/Web 2.0 Collaboration/Online Assessment for data.



The majority of districts (82 percent) have adopted digital citizenship curriculum or policies for students and staff. Sixty-eight percent of districts assess students’ technology skills. Refer to Section 5, Student, Instruction and Leadership Technology Skills for data.
 
The data below indicate the percentage of districts that have adopted the nine elements of Digital Citizenship as part of a technology culture through either curriculum or an Acceptable Use Policy for students and staff.
 
  • Digital Access – 95%, increase of 4% from 2010
  • Digital Commerce – 60%, increase of 6.5% from 2010
  • Digital Communication – 90%, increase of 3% from 2010
  • Digital Literacy/Education – 85%, increase of 4% from 2010
  • Digital Etiquette – 86%, no change from 2010
  • Digital Law – 72%, increase of 3% from 2010
  • Digital Rights and Responsibilities – 93%, increase of 3% from 2010
  • Digital Health and Wellness/Safety – 72%, decrease of 7% from 2010
  • Digital Security/Self Protection – 86%, increase of 1% from 2010
Thanks to investment by districts and KDE, the number of schools connected by fiber-like connections (large Internet highways) to the Internet continues to increase each year from 67 percent in 2006 to 96 percent in 2011. The increase enables schools to use more diverse Internet-based instructional and assessment opportunities for students. Refer to Section 6 of the Survey, Network Connectivity for data.



It is estimated that, during the next two years, districts will replace approximately 40 percent of the telephone systems within school buildings. Of these schools, 83 percent will choose to transition to Voice Over IP (VOIP) with their phone upgrades. This allows school districts to leverage their investment in fiber technology to reduce recurring costs by investing in non traditional phone systems such as VOIP, managed and/or hosted Voice Services. Refer to Section 7, Ease of Access to Telephonic Services for data.

Since 2007, access to LCD projectors or other large-area viewing devices (i.e., plasma or LCD large-screen televisions) has become an expected part of the instructional classroom. Data show that there were 1,540 classrooms and 1,719 projection devices added. This leads us to believe that almost every classroom has a projection device included. Students no longer must use desktop monitors or small televisions for viewing instructional materials. School districts are investing in Intelligent/Smart Classroom technologies to further the educational experiences of students. Refer to Section 8, Intelligent Classrooms for data.
 


Almost 68 percent of all schools and districts encourage teachers and district staff to use Web 2.0 tools (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, YouTube), yet only half of all districts have a board of education policy addressing the issue. Only 8 percent of districts strictly prohibit the use of Web 2.0 by teachers and district staff. Refer to Section 9, Video Conferencing/Web 2.0 Collaboration/Online Assessment for data.


Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning Survey (TELL) - Kentucky's educators set a record response rate of 87% for the second instance of the TELL survey, administered in 2013. This is designed to assess whether critical teaching and learning conditions are present in schools throughout Kentucky. Below is a sampling of the 2013 TELL findings related to technology, compared to the results of the first survey from 2011.
 
  • 82 percent of the teachers surveyed feel that they have sufficient access to instructional technology, including computers, printers, software and Internet access, an increase of 1 percent from 2011.
  • 94 percent of the teachers feel that they have access to reliable communication technology, including phones, faxes and e-mail, a decrease of 1 percent from 2011.
  • 76 percent of the teachers surveyed feel that the reliability and speed of their school's Internet connections are sufficient to support instructional practices, a decrease of 5 percent from 2011.
  • 96 percent of the teachers surveyed feel that school leadership facilitates using data to improve student learning, an increase of 2 percent from 2011.
  • 86 percent of the teachers surveyed believe that professional development offerings are data-driven, an increase of 2 percent from 2011.
  • 74 percent of the teachers surveyed believe that they have sufficient training to fully utilize instructional technology, an increase of 3 percent from 2011.
  • 58 percent of the teachers surveyed feel that they need professional development with regard to integrating technology into instruction, a decrease of 4 percent from 2011.
  • 43 percent of the teachers surveyed have had 10 clock hours or more of professional development with regard to integrating technology into instruction, a decrease of 4 percent from 2011.
  • 88 percent of the teachers surveyed believe that local assessment data are available in time to impact instructional practices, an increase of 2 percent from 2011.
  • 94 percent of the teachers surveyed believe that they use assessment data to inform their instruction, an increase of 2 percent from 2011.
  • 85 percent of the teachers surveyed indicated that the support that they received from their mentors with regard to using data to identify student needs was beneficial, an increase of 5 percent from 2011.
 
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Rachel Richards
Office of Knowledge, Information and Data Services
Division of Engineering and Management
15 Fountain Place
Frankfort, KY 40601
502-564-2020 x251
Fax: 502-564-1519